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Winter’s Chill

Winter’s chill made an early surprise attack on my little island freezing pipes and icing roads. We even had a minor dusting of snow the other morning that brought joy to some and panic to others. Though the snow barely settled before it was but a memory of winter’s past the chill has remained for days. About a month early for these parts and my weekend was spent partly attending to west coast winter dilemma such as rummaging about the workshop looking for that lost chicken coop heat lamp. There is nothing sadder than the scene of a chicken beak-frozen to the water trough. Alas, I take it with humour because it could be worse. December on Salt Spring Island usually means wet winter storms, high winds and power outages. I will always take a clear and chilly winter day.

With Christmas sneaking up fast and a space cleared in the living room of our cabin to be filled shortly with a tree the items under it wrapped with care and my anticipation of happiness at their giving, it is those items that cannot beat the gift of a Sunday morning coffee and a spontaneous outing to the woods at the south of the island with good company. What we found with our cameras was worth being pulled from the warmth of a coffee shop to standing chilly on the fringes of an icy lake and waterfall. Here is a sampling of what we found.

Ice forms on stones in waterfall pools. Photo by Dave Barnes

Ice forms on stones in waterfall pools.
Photo by Dave Barnes

Waterfall spray freezes over surrounding moss and leaves. Photo by Dave Barnes

Waterfall spray freezes over surrounding moss and leaves.
Photo by Dave Barnes

Nothing escapes the freeze. not even a sapling. Photo by Dave Barnes

Nothing escapes the freeze. not even a sapling.
Photo by Dave Barnes

Only in Canada, eh. Photo by Dave Barnes

Only in Canada, eh.
Photo by Dave Barnes

On a morning that I wished I had brought the macro lens for all the small textures that nature presented. Photo by Dave Barnes

On a morning that I wished I had brought the macro lens for all the small textures that nature presented.
Photo by Dave Barnes

Frozen water wishing to flow as the water moves freely below.  Photo by Dave Barnes

Frozen water wishing to flow as the water moves freely below.
Photo by Dave Barnes

Wooden pallets make a bridge to the swimming dock used all summer by nudists at a local lake. No chilly behinds to be found today! Photo by Dave Barnes

Wooden pallets make a bridge to the swimming dock used all summer by nudists at a local lake. No chilly behinds to be found today!
Photo by Dave Barnes

A shot from the space shuttle, no. Lovely textured ice on the surface of the lake. Photo by Dave Barnes

A shot from the space shuttle, no. Lovely textured ice on the surface of the lake.
Photo by Dave Barnes

Roots frozen into the ice reeds stand tall on the lake edge. Photo by Dave Barnes

Roots frozen into the ice reeds stand tall on the lake edge.
Photo by Dave Barnes

A cool winter wind met me for this shot, but it was too good to pass up. Photo by Dave Barnes

A cool winter wind met me for this shot, but it was too good to pass up.
Photo by Dave Barnes

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Queen of the Peak 2013, Tofino, BC

On our way to Tofino we stopped for lunch and turned our server green with envy. Photo by Dave BarnesWhen I think about Tofino, BC many images come to my mind’s eye in an overwhelming stream of memories from childhood wanderings and play on Long Beach (now Pacific Rim National Park) amongst the hippie kids and resident squatter community living a sandy lifestyle of the mid-70’s, and my more current experiences kayaking the area.QOP 1

Much has changed in the little village that is quite literally at the end of the road to the west side of Vancouver Island, and much has remained the same. Time and tide are the constant though Tofino endures an annual invasion of summer tourist that whips the local routine into a frenzy. Campsites are bursting to overflow, beaches packed with wanderers and surfers. The town is populated with bus tours and backpackers. But in the fall, much like my home on Salt Spring Island, which is also a tourist destination the flow slows. Regulars in town reappear after a summer hibernation and everything returns to a normal pace.

In the case of Tofino that pace remains humming as the ‘storm-watching’ season begins. The surf warning sign is changed from low to moderate or even high, the campsites are plentiful and the air is always clear and crisp. That is the first thing that hits me each time I set out on whatever beach I am closest too upon arrival in Tofino. The air at home is still, rainforest calm scent of trees and seaweed. Out there on Chesterman’s Beach, McKenzie Beach, Cox Bay or Long Beach the air is like a chilled white wine by comparison to my luke warm Merlot air of home. West coast Pacific air immediately refreshes the spirit and it all seems somehow brighter.

Qop 2Last week my wife and I revisited the place of our honeymoon and the familiar scene that welcomes us even after a two-year absence. We set up camp near the ocean and our soundtrack that first night would be pounding surf mixed with the rapid attack of raindrops on our tarp. By morning, nothing but high clouds and mild temperatures greeted us as we sipped coffee at the Common Loaf Bakery in town before heading to Cox Bay, home this year to the Queen of the Peak women’s surf competition hosting wave riders from all over, with the high content of local talent. The first day of the meet was the short boarders hitting the larger waves of the weekend following some stormy days. This was my first experience watching real surfers doing what they do best and the show did not disappoint. The joy, smiles and pure athleticism of these women was astounding. Making the paddle out through a rockery to sneak out behind the incoming sets of waves was made to look easy. The rides were in some cases long and the return paddle to get the next wave equally daunting.

This was a trip that led me to Tofino at the head of one of best kayaking destinations around, Clayoquot Sound once more without my kayak on the roof rack? Though I was not there to paddle the Tofino experiences only added to the library of lovely memories from my first sight of the endless beaches when I was still in single digits and all the way to present day when I can share the experience and love of a place with the love of my life. But next time I am taking my kayak!

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Kayak Renovations…

Summer it seems is showing the signs that the last act of the play is about to start and a season of heavy kayaking has come and gone for me without much time on the water. This was a summer of working, not playing. That said, I pulled my wooden kayak off the seas for a well-deserved renovation and care. The new job slowed the process and though I had the enthusiasm, the body was pooped and my days off spent catching up on rest and other more important things.

Alas, October is now scratching at the door like a wet cat and my kayak sits partly done. sigh. Today I realized that my gelcoating efforts should be beefed up as sanding her belly smooth revealed more wood than smoothness when removing the orange rind dimples I really should have been more generous with the gel coat… Another few coats to be added and a few more evening, and weekend sessions wet sanding to get the pro finish I really want. My newbie efforts at refinishing are showing but a bit more elbow grease is okay with me. She deserves it after so many years of keeping me safe and joyful.

So my summer project becomes a fall project. The kayak rebirth in the new year, her tenth year on the water with a shine and a new look.

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